Humanist Perspectives: issue 204: Antifa and Erinnerungen

Antifa and Erinnerungen
by James Bacque

Antifa
The antifa rally on Dresden Konigsbruckstr. on 2010-02-13. [Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons/Masur.]
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s Alfred de Zayas shows in this issue, the Antifa are a great danger to such freedom of expression as remains in Germany. Having dinner one evening in Berlin in 1991 with the famous historian Ernst Nolte, I referred to the statement by former German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer in his Erinnerungen (Memoirs) that six million Germans had been killed during the ethnic cleansing of about 14 million Germans from Silesia and Brandenburg and by Allied actions between 1945 and 1950. Nolte did not believe me. After dinner we went back to his apartment and Nolte took down his personal copy of the book and read the statement for himself. Three other eminent German writers, Richard Matthias Mueller, Otto Kimminich and the well-known scholar Dr. Alfred de Zayas similarly disbelieved what I said, although all of them had already read the Erinnerungen themselves, years before, and had forgotten it.

One perceptive German told me in 1989, when my book Other Losses exposing Allied atrocities against German civilians after the war appeared in Germany, that “Only a Canadian could have written that book.

All of them are accurate, diligent and brave scholars who had already denounced Allied crimes against Germans. I report this not to criticize them but to point out how powerful is the influence of political Fascist correctness even on such eminent figures. If even these scholars can be induced to censor themselves, the Antifa are succeeding beyond their own wild hopes. Canada is already under attack by them.

One perceptive German told me in 1989, when my book Other Losses exposing Allied atrocities against German civilians after the war appeared in Germany, that “Only a Canadian could have written that book.” I did not believe him then but now I do. My first editors were John Fraser at Saturday Night, Nelson Doucette at Stoddart, and Jack McClelland at McClelland and Stewart, all of whom understood the cardinal rule of such publishing: “Innocuous controversy sells.” Since then, forces very like the Antifa in Canada have frightened nearly all the publishers, editors and book reviewers in this timid country from publishing my work. Nor would PEN or The Writers’ Union of Canada stand up for the right of the public to read my work. In fact, the Union itself refused to publish an article of mine about this in their own house-journal.

To them I say, TWUC TWUC TWUC.

James Bacque is an historian, novelist, and playwright, who lives in Ontario. He is the author of Crimes and Mercies and Other Losses.

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